Crash Logs

Daniel Jalkut on how to get the most out of crash logs. It’s good advice.

Actually I do have one big issue with the article:

If there’s one behavior of your application that you should focus on eliminating, it’s the behavior of crashing. Above all other “nuisances,” this is the one that is absolutely unacceptable.

But preserving someone’s data is more important then crashing. Having to rewrite your paper because your PC devoured it is worse then crashing. Crashing may be the worst “nuisance”, but there are more important bugs to squash first. However that is a topic for another time — we all agree that crashes are a problem should be fixed.

Although Daniel shows how to synthesize debugging symbols from hex-address, I think it’s worth considering leaving debugging symbols in your shipping app.

The reasons for [building applications without debugging symbols] are mostly to keep the shipping application as small as possible, but there are also some good reasons to hide the symbols if they reveal too much about your business strategy.

I can’t say anything about your business strategies, but removing information that can help you diagnose problems “in the field” seems like a very bad trade-off for slightly smaller files.

Hard-drives cost about $0.30 per gigabyte (GB), and the price is still falling fast*. Because the GB is the unit hard-disks are sold by, I am going to use it instead of MB or KB; I think it puts file-sizes into the right perspective.

Today’s applications are “big”, for a very good reason. That article says it better then I can, but the gist of it is that megabytes are cheaper then air and bigger programs can do more, making them more useful (the cost of a GB of storage space has fallen over 20 fold since the article was written, by the way).

The largest program I use every day that was built with debugging symbols on is EyeTV. It weighs in under 0.11 GB, and I don’t consider that “bloated”, because I get good value for my 3 cents of disk-space. Stripping debugging symbols with strip makes it 0.0076 GB smaller. That translates into $0.002 worth of hard disk, that could store 13.7 seconds of TV . And that is insignificant. A few thousandths of a GB make little difference, and that’s all stripping debugging symbols will get you.

Of course, this is all academic if no one ever sees the crash-logs. Unfortunately, developers know, that’s the current crappy state of affairs. Crash reports are sent to Apple, and only Apple. The developers who wrote the program — the ones who could best fix the problem, and who desperately want to know about it, are completely out of the loop.

If Apple passed crash logs on to developers, everyone would win. Developers would be able to squash more bugs in less time. Users would have a better, more productive and bug free, experience. Apple could sell those improvements. Microsoft already does this, and it seems to work well for them. Most people are unaware of this SNAFU, and probably think that reporting the crash to Apple gets the information to the right people. I don’t know if educating people about the issue would light a fire under Apple, but it might.

—-

If enough people start using flash memory over current magnetic-platter harddrives, then the price-per-GB ratio could change, because flash is currently about 100x more expensive (per GB). But the trend of the current storage-medium’s price exponentially falling will continue

Flash-based notebooks are already here, but they aren’t popular, yet.

But by the time flash-based computers become popular, their cost-per-GB will probably be as good, or better, then full-sized hard drives of today. Tiny hard-drives, using conventional magnetic platters, like the ones in the iPod, are also a compelling alternative to flash.

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Debugging, Design, MacOSX, Programming, Tips

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: